Welcome to my corner of the web, where I keep notes on the business of developing software based solutions that collect data and turn it into intuitively actionable information.

IT Sections

The IT section covers the whole process of Application Development, among other topics.

The Glossary is an organised entry point to notes on industry technologies, protocols and products, and business terms one hears.

Presentations

To take your time going over a presentation I have given, view it again on the Presentations page.

Blog

Or simply read the Blogs during my Pomodoro breaks between trying to find solutions to problems under lack of time, budget and your average IT duress.

Errata Blog

A blog about the current moment…

Link to more entries: Errata, Life, Humour, etc.

Business As Usual, in our unique way….

2019/08/08 12:17 · skys

Overheard (in my head):

“When we're talking about using common standards we're not talking about using our Standard Stupidity…”

2019/08/08 09:54 · skys

In total, Winegard estimates that mosquitoes have killed more people than any other single cause—fifty-two billion of us, nearly half of all humans who have ever lived. He calls them “our apex predator,” “the destroyer of worlds,” and “the ultimate agent of historical change.”

Src: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/08/05/how-mosquitoes-changed-everything

2019/08/05 15:44 · skys

What we just heard was:

“We've gone out to market for Requirements…“

2019/08/05 13:45 · skys

“Mental models are how we understand the world. Not only do they shape what we think and how we understand but they shape the connections and opportunities that we see. Mental models are how we simplify complexity, why we consider some things more relevant than others, and how we reason.

A mental model is simply a representation of how something works. We cannot keep all of the details of the world in our brains, so we use models to simplify the complex into understandable and organizable chunks.

Thinking Better The quality of our thinking is proportional to the models in our head and their usefulness in the situation at hand. The more models you have—the bigger your toolbox—the more likely you are to have the right models to see reality. It turns out that when it comes to improving your ability to make decisions variety matters.

Most of us, however, are specialists. Instead of a latticework of mental models, we have a few from our discipline. Each specialist sees something different. By default, a typical Engineer will think in systems. A psychologist will think in terms of incentives. A biologist will think in terms of evolution. By putting these disciplines together in our head, we can walk around a problem in a three dimensional way. If we’re only looking at the problem one way, we’ve got a blind spot. And blind spots can kill you.

Here’s another way to think about it. When a botanist looks at a forest they may focus on the ecosystem, an environmentalist sees the impact of climate change, a forestry engineer the state of the tree growth, a business person the value of the land. None are wrong, but neither are any of them able to describe the full scope of the forest. Sharing knowledge, or learning the basics of the other disciplines, would lead to a more well-rounded understanding that would allow for better initial decisions about managing the forest.

In a famous speech in the 1990s, Charlie Munger summed up the approach to practical wisdom through understanding mental models by saying: “Well, the first rule is that you can’t really know anything if you just remember isolated facts and try and bang ’em back. If the facts don’t hang together on a latticework of theory, you don’t have them in a usable form. You’ve got to have models in your head. And you’ve got to array your experience both vicarious and direct on this latticework of models. You may have noticed students who just try to remember and pound back what is remembered. Well, they fail in school and in life. You’ve got to hang experience on a latticework of models in your head.”

Building your latticework is a lifelong project. Stick with it, and you’ll find that your ability to understand reality, make consistently good decisions, and help those you love will always be improving.”

Well summarized!

Src: https://fs.blog/mental-models/

2019/08/04 18:31 · skys

Dry .NET Blog

A blog about the latest code fragment that titillate me…

Link to more entries: NET Entries

”If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob out children of tomorrow”.

2019/06/13 12:04